incompatible coalescence

nezlúčiteľné splynutie

2019

In “Incompatible coalescence” series Prackova uses multiple exposures to reveal some primordial, natural, wild state in different parts of the world, in this case in Orinoco in Latin America. Prackova liberates pure feeling of a moment and freedom in it. Taking pictures of mighty streams and rivers of the world, Prackova strengthens the experience, folding states that are incompatible at the first glance, superimposing one image on another. The result of this “merging” are the works full of elemental, natural power, releasing not only human experience, but sending us to the essence of the genius loci, which is in this case is Venezuela. This works exist out of political context, but speaks about natural, primordial state of fullness, about mystery kept by nature. This series reveals not just spontaneity of Orinoco, but more freedom, inner emancipation of these places. The works are dated to 2019, when political context of a place is on its peak though sending us back to the date of shooting – 2008, giving possibility to travel in time into the past, but concrete state. Prackova revives this state that possibly didn’t go anywhere, that exists out of politically biased informational space: she creates spontaneous elemental stream which is full of freedom and abundance that is kept by genius loci, a power of Orinoco’s nature. The work of Prackova overcomes modern conflict, she washes it off, liberating some feeling that she draws from nature, or which leading her through nature. The work of Prackova essentially is a portal to unknown, very deep experience outgoing from nature and testifies about unity of the author with some state, about her merge with some essence that fills her and as a sip of refreshing cold water brings viewer back to life, resurrecting him to a new perception. She tells about deep unity with the nature of these places, calling a viewer to a moment of determination, belief to some primordial, primal, mystery full of initial knowledge.

Text by Nikita Pirigov, 2019